instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there. 
If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.


This is visually amazing instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there. 
If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.


This is visually amazing instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there. 
If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.


This is visually amazing instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there. 
If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.


This is visually amazing instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there. 
If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.


This is visually amazing instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there. 
If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.


This is visually amazing

instagram:

Capturing the Airplanes of St. Maarten’s Maho Beach with @samhorine

To view more photos and videos from Maho Beach, explore the Maho Beach, Sint Maarten location page.

Maho Beach on the Dutch side of the Caribbean country of Sint Maarten has white sand and turquoise waters, but that’s not why visitors flock there. The beach is famous for planes that buzz sunbathers at low altitudes en route to landing at the Princess Juliana International Airport. Arriving aircraft must touch down as close as possible to the beginning of Runway 10 because of its short 2,300-meter (7,500-foot) landing strip.

New York Instagrammer Sam Horine (@samhorine) recently visited Maho Beach while on a layover. “I walked down the airport road for 10 minutes and turned a corner to find a large crowd of people swimming, sunbathing, drinking cheap Carib beers and waiting for the jets to come in,” he says. “I first watched a few smaller island hoppers come in—a plane lands or takes off every 20 minutes or so. Then, a 757 pulled up for take off. People ran over to the short fence separating the beach and the runway and grabbed hold of the chain link. The jet’s engines turned on and it tore down the runway kicking up sand. Hats, sunglasses and other small items flew past me as the jet blasted down the runway for takeoff. It was truly an amazing, and sandy, experience.”

To get a great shot of the planes, Sam has a few tips:

  • I really liked the perspective of the jets coming in over the beach from the side. It gave a great perspective of how low the planes were and how many people were there.
  • If you’re shooting from the side, I found it helpful to frame the shot before the plane gets there to figure out exactly when you’ll need to start shooting.
  • You can also stand on the beach and let the planes come right over you or wade out into the water and eliminate the beach completely—at the right time of day the jets will cast their shadows down on the water.
  • Don’t underestimate shooting back at the crowd from the beach and catching the planes from behind as they come in above the crowd.
  • Shoot in burst mode if you can. It’s a matter of seconds between when the plane’s a small speck in the frame to when it’s roaring overhead. I missed a few planes at first because of the speed.
  • Lastly, I shot in the square crop on my phone so I could make sure I got the entire plane in the frame to post to Instagram.

This is visually amazing

If I was a soccer player

Leslie Njamen Tita > will be name on my jersey if I was a soccer player , unfortunately I’m not sure thats something I can do but this is what I can, who decides to publish an ongoing book on a blog, well I’m about to, and I hope its an experiment that could work, so here you are leslietita.co click away ☺

Leslie Njamen Tita Blog turned 3 today!

Africa a different story

Leslie Njamen Tita, an excerpt of a book im working on “C’est de la Bouyabaise !!!”, the sentence I use each time I find a situation unbelievably ridiculous, and right now that is what I’m saying while writing this. Just to clear out any doubt I am not a hero, an ex-soldier, a millionaire, an ex convict, politician or a child soldier.


I will not be dramatic or self pitying, this is not a #kony2012 campaign.


Though, I may not have invented anything yet or won the lottery or raised a Million dollars for my startup; the fact is as a young adult I face similar challenges any Black - African - Cameroonian would face; finishing with school, career job, thinking of dropping out and focusing on my startup full-time, trying to convince my friends to invest their money in me, reassuring my mother everything is fine, uploading wonderful pictures of me on facebook and keeping up with my emotional life, wondering why it didnt work out with my ex.


Instead of focusing on those negative thoughts Ill like to share something I believe in fervently, something journalists, authors, critics, and some of my very own people instead harshly criticize and complain about, with a majority of their solutions being nothing but insanely radical.

I believe in the nation of Cameroon

I’ve always wondered if there was something I personally could do for my nation, because the Cameroon I know is beautiful, challenging, corrupt, young, lazy, poor and ambitious, but most importantly, no matter what I think of this country it will continue to thrive in an upward curve, if not for the straightforward reason the is a brink of hope, for everyone. Economists, politicians, journalists and foreign policy experts with their statistics and historical facts may find counter arguments to prove me wrong, but I have come to learn that in life “they are lies, damn lies and statistics”.

 

nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal
nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]
As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.
We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).
I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.
I also had an amazing team this weekend.
Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.
Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.
#thegrindisreal

nzingambande:

[Photo Courtesy of Andrew Hong. MIT Museum. Left to Right. Andrew Wong, Netia McCray (Me), and Leslie Tita]

As part of my dedication this semester to learning as much as I can about prototyping mechanical and electrical hardware, I signed myself up to participate in the MakewithMOTO Makeathon at the MIT Museum.

We spent two days prototyping a storytelling product that interacts with the Motorola Razr HD Smartphone. As a child plays a story on the Motorola smartphone, the storytelling board will flash its embedded LEDs to correspond to certain moments in the story that need special effects (e.g. when the story comes across the word ‘storm’ the LEDs will flash quickly in order to stimulate a storm).

I was proud of myself for getting the hang of Solidworks in order to create the hardware shell on the generously provided laser cutter and 3D printer (from 3D Systems) as well as working on the electronic component of the piece with a touch of programming in the Motorola environment Protocoder.

I also had an amazing team this weekend.

Special Thanks to the MakewithMOTO team, Andrew Hong, and last but not least Leslie Tita for coming up with the project idea.

Now, to start on my homework that I have been procrastinating on for the duration of this four-day weekend.

#thegrindisreal

nzingambande:

I almost fell out of my chair while watching this clip…then Keke Palmer shows up at the end of the clip as the Anger Translator for Malia Obama.

Priceless.

This conversation is the conversation that every professional black couple I’ve encountered has in the privacy of their home. A true partner is able to imagine their spouse’s Anger Translator or as they used to say…read between the lines. ;)

Leslie Tita Njamen reblogged this.

I havent changed much……

My favorite animal

When I was younger our teacher asked what my favorite animal was, and I said, “Fried chicken.” 
She said I wasn’t funny, but she couldn’t have been right, because everyone else laughed.
 
My parents told me to always tell the truth. I did. Fried chicken is my favorite animal. 
I told my dad what happened, and he said my teacher was probably a member of PETA. 
He said they love animals very much.
 
I do, too. Especially chicken, pork and beef. Anyway, my teacher sent me to the principal’s office. 
I told him what happened, and he laughed, too. Then he told me not to do it again.
 
The next day in class my teacher asked me what my favorite live animal was. 
I told her it was chicken. She asked me why, so I told her it was because you could make them into fried chicken.
 
She sent me back to the principal’s office. He laughed, and told me not to do it again. 
 
I don’t understand. My parents taught me to be honest, but my teacher doesn’t like it when I am.
 
Today, my teacher asked me to tell her what famous person I admired most. I told her, “Colonel Sanders.” 
 
Guess where I am now…
 
*** Thanks, labbie48

Im late to the thanksgiving game, but this dog-fowl tasted good.

30 years later, where do we go from here ?

Imagine this scenario, you are given an important piece of property to maintain, and your contract last 5 years. At first you are hysterical, happy, you have a great new job, and also the security you will not be fired over the next couple of years, your first days are great, dressing up nicely everyday, treating everybody nice, taking care of the property, consulting your employer for any important decision. Everybody likes you.

Over the next couple of years, you grow incredibly good at your job, earning the respect of your employer, so you consult him less and grow more independent. Your great work earns you an extension for another 5 years. Great right ?

At the 10 year mark, you consider yourself a veteran, an experienced and knowledgeable person who knows it all and needs little outside advice, if you started at 20, now you are 30, do you remember your thought process at age 20 ?

Your ideas about how to run the property evolve with you, and because you believe you had been successful in the past you think you can do this your whole life.

But you see thats where you start getting it wrong.

Your ambition and vision starts to distort your real mission, from taking care of the land you decide to take over the land and next take over your owners. and even though you were hired because you were a great fit, your short sightedness, ego and ambition will cloud your judgement even if that was not your original intent.

At that point you will start suffering from what is called Marlow’s Rhetoric of Self.

Now take a look at Cameroon’s president. he has been in office for the past 30 years, that is two hundred and sixty two thousand eight hundred man hours working.

Can an individual rule for that long ? Yes, but can they rule without self rhetoric ? the human nature proves otherwise.

I read a lot of hate comments and tweets from people on the last 30 years of his presidency, they even started a trend #30ansansmourir (30 years without dieing), why people will wish death unto an individual, still boggles me. He is doing his job as president, keeping peace and stability, on the other hand, the economy has been far from prosperous, it never recovered from the ‘92 economic crisis, the unemployment rate is alarming, over 10 million unemployed, and the youth have lost patience, the foundation of any country.

The way out of this will be very excruciatingly painful, challenging and hard ,but I have good news for you. It only gets better from here, a lot of the young people I talk to, are creating businesses, startups, trying to go back to Cameroon, and depending on themselves not the government for their financial success.

Even though some people assume they are prepared for a new president, deep down they are not, research studies shows people hate change, and they are scared of what a new president will do.

Nevertheless I like comparing Paul Biya’s 30 years reign to the evolution of the iPhone, a strong slow repetition of small incremental changes.

Things can change, things will change, things are changing, slowly but surely, painfully but inevitably, Humans were meant to thrive.

Do you have ideas on how we could move forward from here, I’ll love to hear them. why not start a trend #waystomoveforward ?